New word: Vermicomposting

A couple weeks ago, I ordered new work shoes and live red wiggler worms (optimal for vermicomposting as they produce the fastest) online. Yes, that’s right. I ordered worms (guaranteed live delivery!) online from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm. After purchasing the worms, all of my Internet ads were either from Reebok or hippie composting websites.

In typical welcoming Iowa fashion, I started collecting compostable material for the worms before they arrived, so as to prepare their comfortable home. They can eat coffee grounds and the used filters, rinsed-out eggshells, tea bags and lots of other compostable table scraps. I saved some baby lettuce leaves, too. No onions, citrus or animal scraps (except the eggshells) because they cause odors and the worms won’t eat them anyway. The worms, if taken care of and not fed too much, can eat twice their size in food and will turn it into worm castings — rich soil that I plan to use to nourish my potted plants and the flower bed. In short, I’m gon’ grow me a big heap of worm dung. Nice.

On the morning that my worms arrived, I had already picked up my sister from the airport for her stay in Washington, D.C. She helped me document their arrival and new home.

Suzanne and I at the National Zoo during her stay in D.C.
Suzanne and I at the National Zoo during her stay in D.C. Can you see the red panda?
The mail-woman wasn't to conscientious. The box's arrival was announced by the sound of it slamming up against my door.
The mail-woman wasn’t too conscientious. The box’s arrival was announced by the sound of it slamming against my door.
Suzanne and I used a lighter and a kitchen knife to poke holes in the plastic storage bin I bought at Target. We tore up newspaper and cardboard and misted it with water. The worms can be started on moist newspaper and cardboard alone until they start to reproduce, which takes months from what I can gather.
Suzanne and I used a lighter and a kitchen knife to poke holes in the plastic storage bin I bought at Target. Real tools, folks. We tore up newspaper and cardboard and misted it with water. The worms can be started on moist newspaper and cardboard alone until they start to reproduce, which takes months from what I can gather. They don’t like change, these worms. I can relate.

So, welcome worms.

Hope you like it here, little guys. I keep them outside so as to avoid the whole worm on my pillow nightmare. Since the apartment is the basement floor, the space out back is cool and dark.
Hope you like it here, little guys. I keep them outside so as to avoid the whole worm-on-my-pillow nightmare. We have a shaded, in-ground patio that is cool and dark, which makes a perfect home for the worm bin.
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